The mission of the Shale Gas Governance Center is to promote research, teaching and outreach on the governance issues posed in Pennsylvania, the United States and around the world by the emergence of the “shale gas revolution.”

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October 06, 2017

As part of the Shale Gas Governance Center fall lecture series, GSPIA alumnus and Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale gave a talk on “Impact Fees: working as promised?” covering the history and implementation of impact fees on shale gas extraction.

October 02, 2017

Nick McClure, a second year MPA student, spent his summer internship researching, writing and editing for GSPIA's Shale Gas Governance Center.  He applied to the internship with the goal to strengthen his skills as a researcher and writer. While his goals were fully realized, he also gained "unexpected, yet profitable, experiences in organizational development," explained McClure.  The following article describes his experiences in more detail.  

September 15, 2017

GSPIA will host Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale (MPA ’97) at 11:45 p.m., Wed., Sept. 20 at the Twentieth Century Club (4201 Bigelow Blvd.). In this special talk, Mr. DePasquale will discuss the “Impact Fee” on unconventional gas wells in Pennsylvania.

August 31, 2017

Earlier this year, Alex Austin, a second year MPA student, had the opportunity to intern with the World Wildlife Fund. Originally published in GSPIA Perspectives, the following is an excerpt from his reflection on his experience.

In addition to a full-time course load, I spent the Spring of 2016 working remotely as the Energy Intern for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Northern Great Plains office located in Bozeman, Montana. As the energy intern, I was tasked with researching the effects of oil development on split estate surface owners residing in the Williston Basin region of Western North Dakota. The Basin is home to the Bakken oil-bearing formation which stretches from the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan in Canada to parts of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. 

August 04, 2017

Katie Jo Black, Shawn J. McCoy & Jeremy G. Weber

To pay for environmental and public infrastructure costs associated with shale gas wells, Pennsylvania introduced a per-well Impact Fee despite concerns that it would discourage industry investment. Using a quasi-experimental design and data that nearly cover the universe of leases and wells in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia, we find that leasing by energy firms declined dramatically after the Fee’s enactment, but little to no declines in well permitting or drilling occurred in the most geologically similar subsample.  


Featured Publication

Katie Jo Black, Shawn J. McCoy & Jeremy G. Weber

To pay for environmental and public infrastructure costs associated with shale gas wells, Pennsylvania introduced a per-well Impact Fee despite concerns that it would discourage industry investment. Using a quasi-experimental design and data that nearly cover the universe of leases and wells in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia, we find that leasing by energy firms declined dramatically after the Fee’s enactment, but little to no declines in well permitting or drilling occurred in the most geologically similar subsample.  


 
 

Shale Gas Governance Center
3420 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260